Cornelia (Nini) Davies

Chinese Acupuncture
at Loddiswell, Kingsbridge, Devon

 BAcC (UK), Cert Ac (Beijing), Cert Ac (Nanjing), MBAcC

 

And here's what it actually says:
PIN POINT LIMERICKS

LINCOLN SHAW OFF THE HOOK

Continuing the poetic theme of recent weeks I have been sent a book of rhymes that are both unusual and pin point sharp.

Not so long ago acupuncture was regarded with suspicion by many people. A weird, mysterious ritual from the Far East that might do for the Chinese but was frowned on by most in our medical profession.

The art of healing by needle has come a long way since then and I know several respected doctors who employ it regularly. But for many the doubts remain, particularly among the older generation. Kingsbridge acupuncturist Cornelia Davies has turned to verse to try to de-mystify the subject.

Not just a scribble for patients and friends but a full blown book, on sale to the general public. She hopes her humour will persuade the doubters to try a form of healing that has been practised for centuries. .
The title is “Acupuncture: The Limericks” and the rhyme on the front cover gives an idea of what to expect inside. It reads:

Acupuncture’s old theories, sublime
Have survived all the rough tests of time—
Upsets major and minor
In far distant China—
Now it’s to suffer in rhyme….

Subjects covered include what patients feel during treatment and what the needles are like through to the more esoteric territory of traditional Chinese diagnosis and the balance of yin and yang.

Another chapter tells the story of a mummified body, dating from before 3,000 BC, found preserved in a glacier near the Austrian-Italian border. It has tattoos on it, which accurately identify acupuncture points.

Nowadays those same points might be used to treat the sorts of degenerative lower back and bowel problems that were evident in the body of that famous iceman, which inspired this little ditty:

Preserved for long years in a glacier,
The iceman’s tattoos were far classier,
Than ‘Cyril love Rose’
From his head to his toes…
He had dots and designs so much sassier!

A touch of humour with a serious message and Cornelia—Nini to her friends—hopes her book will persuade more people to overcome their nervousness at the thought of having needles stuck into their body and give this ancient art a try.

“Acupuncture: The Limericks”, price £9 95 is published by Golden Barn Publishing. Further information by ringing Cornelia on 01548 550251.